Social Media and Politics May Not Generate the Publicity You Want

Read Time:1 Minute, 28 Second

How do you react when you discover someone you have come to really like online doesn’t share the same political views? Do you get into a heated online debate? A new study released last month from the Pew Internet and American Life Project found that 18 percent of people who use social networking sites such as Facebook and Google+ have blocked, unfriended or hidden someone because of that person’s disagreeable political postings.

Every major political season seems to take a toll on even the best of online relationships. One girlfriend told me she had no idea one of her other friends was adamantly opposed to the candidate she was endorsing. She said it broke her heart because of the vicious things she has been saying.

Have you found yourself in a position where you discovered someone you respect and admire doesn’t share your same political views? It can be a tough situation. It can be even more challenging when you are trying to build online relationships. I have, personally, found myself in the same situation. I’ve actually lost connections because of my particular political views and I have also cut ties with others who have displayed an angry, bitter tone about my candidate.

Mixing social media and politics can be tricky business because however you choose to respond will be seen by thousands of eyes. It could be a publicity killer for your reputation if you are trying to conduct business from the same people whose political views you oppose.

So what do you think is the best way to handle online relationships when it comes to politics? Do you choose not to associate with people because of their views or can you separate the two when it comes to business?

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

3 thoughts on “Social Media and Politics May Not Generate the Publicity You Want

  1. I couldn’t agree more. Political and religion discussions can be difficult to navigate in real life and on social media. I try to avoid these contentious subjects if possible. Recently, I had a lively discussion about black unemployment on LinkedIn. I really enjoyed talking about the subject with a particular person. But lo and behold, didn’t I discovered he was affiliated with a political party I don’t like. Yet we were able to have a civil discussion even when we disagreed with each other. Thus, I don’t mind working for the common good with those I disagree with on social and political issues if a civil relationship is possible.

  2. JEANETmarie,
    I agree with you. We can disagree and still be civil with each other. Problem most people don’t understand how to be “civil.” Thanks for stopping by and commenting.

  3. When I first went public, I made a promise to myself to not discuss politics or religion online. I am here to tell you, it is so very hard to keep my fingers away from the keyboard when I see something that upsets me! I do not like anyone that uses offensive language, makes cruel or crude jokes about others. I can appreciate comedic satire and even harmless sarcasm, but not out and out flamers or haters. What’s the point? You only wind up making yourself look small, uneducated, and without basic manners.

    While I enjoy a good conversation with polite company about differences of political ideas, or religious beliefs, I will walk away if it becomes heated to the point of foul references. Be fair, remain open minded, and try your best look at both sides of the debate. If you only discuss one side of any issue, what can you really learn?

    I have learned to be open minded because my husband and I have never agreed on politics and we have been happily married over three decades. We often talk and have a good laugh about how we cancel each other’s vote! It is kind of a family joke. But, we taught our children, who also have chosen different sides, to sit down and read the issues and to intelligently discuss our differences. We never told them who or what to vote for, they knew it was always their decision to make.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Previous post What Does Your Publicity Barometer Look Like
Next post Connecting with Kathy Ireland on Twitter