Diversity and the English Language

Read Time:1 Minute, 2 Second

We, as Americans, share a common language, but as in other countries, not all people speak it the same way. The U.S. has its own family of dialects that differ depending on what part of the country you live in.

People establish a dialect when they live together within set social or geographical boundaries over time. As they use language with limited outside influence, they develop characterizing words, grammar, syntax, and expressions. A dialect can even evolve so far as to become a different language.

Numerous studies have shown that we instantly attach cultural stereotypes and subjective judgments about a person’s knowledge and abilities from hearing their accent in speech. For example, when you hear a Southern twang, you may be inclined to believe that person has received little or no formal education. Or how about when you hear a black person speak with a proper British accent? Stereotypes based on accent are deeply rooted and they have profound consequences. Accents can influence who we select as friends, who we respect with authority and leadership, where we prefer to live, employment, etc.

Depending on where you live will, often times, dictate how you speak and the words you choose to use to assimilate into the culture.

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %

Average Rating

5 Star
0%
4 Star
0%
3 Star
0%
2 Star
0%
1 Star
0%

2 thoughts on “Diversity and the English Language

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

CommentLuv badge

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Previous post New Communications Website Launch
Next post Train of Thought in Writing